/prənʌnsi’eɪʃən/

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Introduction

The film

Note from Tara and Rachael

Extra film: Andy’s Running Dict/eI/tion

Materials used in the film

Coming soon…

 

Introduction

Here it is: the moment you’ve all been waiting for… Our film has finally been released on the big blog screen! Here we’ve compiled a few of our favourite techniques, games and ideas for teaching pronunciation that we’ve gathered around the staffroom. We hope you enjoy it! But please don’t sign out after watching it. We want your ideas! Your opinions! Have you tried any of these things? What did you think? And do you have anything you’re dying to share? Let us know! Blog it!

The film

What did you think?

Note from Tara and Rachael

I used the IPA to learn accents at Drama School (I do a fine Brooklyn Gangster) and was ambivalent about the reappearance of spidery phonemes in my life during my Celta.  Since I began teaching I have to admit to having got unreasonably excited about pronunciation and the IPA.  It might be the opportunity for humour that the pulling of faces and making of noises allows.  But mostly it is the deep appreciation of the students, who seem to be universally delighted when ‘Teacher’ becomes a duck or a tiger to demonstrate one sound or another.  I have been stopped in corridors by students who wish to correctly pronounce ‘word’ for me; our mutual joy at the achievement is genuine.   My pronunciation adventures with Rachael have been so interesting as I have gained a huge amount of teaching ideas and styles, some of them so perfectly simple and effective you wonder how you never thought of them before.  We hope you gain as much from our discoveries as we have.  Many thanks to everyone who contributed.  Here’s more about our adventures from my lovely colleague Rachael.

 

x Tara

Having studied linguistics, I’ve always been mad about transcribing things into the IPA…but I soon realised that using it to teach pronunciation is an entirely different matter! As someone who learnt languages through listening and imitating (even sometimes unknowingly), it soon became apparent to me that the large majority of language learners, despite being extremely keen to develop a perfect pronunciation, simply cannot hear the sounds; and herein lies the real work in teaching pronunciation.

What I’ve learnt  on this pron journey with Tara, above all, is the sensual nature of pronunciation. So when students cannot hear the sounds, I’ve learnt how to show them how to feel them, and as a result begin to utter them themselves. So it is an integration of three main points or, as Tara and I like to call it, the triangle of sensuality: seeing the phoneme; feeling how it sounds in your mouth/on your teeth/tongue; and hearing it at the same time. It is often only in encouraging the first two that the third happens (I’d like to think organically).

These, however, are no doubt extremely fundamental points which I’m sure most of you discovered a long time ago! As for the actual running around with a camera for the last month, I’ve learnt loads of techniques to encourage students to discover the physicality of producing these sounds, including gestures, miming, and props. Then, on a broader scale, we’ve discovered numerous new games and activities to yank the IPA off the page and get it running around the room. This, however, is only the beginning. While we hope you enjoy the cinematography of our film, we really want it to inspire you to experiment with new ways to teach pron. Why not try some of the techniques and let us know how it went?  Or do you have some pron inspiration that we should know about? We’d love you to use the blog to share your thought and ideas! Finally, a big, big thank you to everyone who helped us along the way, and we’re looking forward to hearing from you soon!

Rach x

Extra film: Andy’s Running Dict/eI/tion

 

 

Materials used in the films

Here are some extra materials for you to download and refer to, or even use in class:

Andy’s Pron-focused Running Dictation: the chunked text

Chunked_Text_Running_Dictation_Andy

Flic’s Scavenger Hunt transcribed in IPA
Scavenger_Hunt_in_IPA_Felicity

Flic’s Simple Sound Maze
Simple_Sound_Maze_Felicity

Flic’s Complex Sound Maze
Complex_Sound_Maze_Felicity

Flic’s Battleships
Battleships_Felicity

Headway Pron Activity

Headway_Pron_Activity_Jayne

Coming soon…

 

*Estelle’s pron pearls of wisdom*

*Flik’s fun with pron*

Got something to say?

 

 

6 Comments

  1. Sophie says:

    Thanks for all the inspiring ideas on pron. Love the fact that you are sharing materials (Flic I am so going to use your battleship)! Well done girls and hope to see more of these projects!

  2. Jonathan Spalton says:

    This was great!
    Love it. Especially… “FACE.”

    I found Adrian Underhill’s intro of his phonemic chart really useful and great to see how he turns teaching pronunciation from a receptive sounds-based approach to an action/movement based productive one. Dead good.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kAPHyHd7Lo

    Also I’ve recently adopted his way of mouthing sounds silently and letting learners provide their own sounds – if you do it right they don’t need a model and are exposed to all the full range of acceptable sounds for each phoneme!

  3. Justin Vollmer says:

    This is fantastic film – incredibly watchable with some great ideas and very entertaining.

    If you haven’t watch it do so now!

  4. Melissa says:

    Amazing film ladies. I was channelling the both of you when teaching the chart to my trainees yesterday. Speaking of which…has anyone noticed that if you read the top line of the vowel sounds (on the chart) from left to right then you find youself making the sound from Starwars when they shut down the reactor?

  5. Melissa says:

    Hi everyone,

    came across as quite fun website of the practising phon:

    http://www.cambridgeenglishonline.com/Phonetics_Focus/#

    Check out the shooting gallery game.

    Melissa

Leave a Reply